news of the world enclave 4, 50 Resolution Way, Deptford, London SE8 4NT

 

Gareth Chambers

Cereal re-edit (performance work)

Friday 25 April 2014, 7pm

Gareth Chambers dance performance

8th August
For a long time now, I was looking for a platform to project and expel myself. To Spucken. The days of fouetté and second positions are dead to me now. They were becoming grey, they were just not relevant to me. Show me the colours, feelings and the lights.

23rd August
I would wander down the hill towards the beach, always towards the beach. And gaze across the bay. Dreaming, imagining and planning.
I just had to do something.
So I danced. What a joy it is to dance and sing. I danced, I read the dusty books in the dusty Townhill library. And I loved.

26th August
Your dancing is joyful, but it won’t last. You dance a dance of love and hate. A dance of feeling. Your movement is angular, jerky but still graceful. Like a drunk Swan.
But you aren’t even that drunk, you are in ecstasy. But like I said before it won’t last.
So when you sneak home, catching the postman’s gaze and crawling into your bed. The bedroom in that smelly student house. Smile in your sleep.

10 September
Are they looking at you? That’s what you want isn’t it?
Thrust the hips
Wiggle the bum
Shake the head.
Gyrate to thin air.

6 November
Why do we feel shame when we are caught dancing around our living rooms by others? Who gives a fuck.

23 November
The discarded jumper on the floor, the slight gesture of the wrist and the tight blue jeans hanging in the cupboard all are doused in your scent. You are nameless, yet you are named. I enjoy watching you from the outside, I find pleasure in your manifestations, emphasise the MAN, Man!
The journey down to Swansea was smooth, the train quiet and I was at peace. The journey to Wales always sedates me.
The session went well, I stumbled and fell. But that is life.

24 November
Go into the fridge, pick up the nearest thing smear it on your body and throw it all over the room. Get that motherfucking carpet dirty. Get the sofa dirty, get your face dirty. Leave the house go to the Tescos and do it all again. Walk through the dirt and you will find yourself.

11 December
I am officially now the holder of a Masters Degree from the Laban Centre. And I feel indifferent

31 January
You meet a guy, spend some boring time with him and then leave.

7 February
I’m undone by your love, your eyes and your gaze. Especially your touch.
Your hands stroke, caress and ultimately sting.
Take the belt to me, white becomes pink, colours combine. Let me call out your name, let me call it out in the darkness of our kitchen.

4 March
People will pass, some might choose to ignore, others will perhaps and hopefully stop and stare. Because you see that’s what I want out of this performance. I want to be viewed and watched. Have that prickly uncomfortable feeling, a feeling I knew all so well in my teens.

31 March
Arrived in the space
Bought ‘Experimentation’ materials
Moved in the Space
Song of the Day ‘Get into the Groove’ by Madonna
Have the urge to dance violently, crazy. With and without prejudice. But I think that is the space talking and not me.

14 April
why can’t there be more moments like this?
Moments of pure joy, hate and forgiveness. The moments that matter, the moments that you remember?
Experiences that grip you and bind you so tightly that you feel utterly and completely knotted.
The summer wind caresses my body, stripping the flesh to reveal sinew and bone. I stand in the park listening to the lament of birds. I’m completely revealed.
I start to dance, Blondie is on the radio. I dance a movement of love and hate. My body moves jerkily. The rhythms come from my centre. You watch keenly and sadly. I feel your pity for me.

Oh why can’t there me more moments like this?

 


previously at news of the world

 

Julien Bayle Disrupt!on
curated by François Larini

Performance installation live: Friday 28th March 2014, starts 7pm sharp in London (8pm local time in Monaco)
Installation in London runs to 13 April 2014

Julien Bayle Disruption
As part of its public programme, the Nouveau Musee National de Monaco –Villa Paloma presents Disrupt!on, a performance installation by Julien Bayle, curated by François Larini (NMNM), which takes place simultaneously and live in Monaco and at news of the world space in London.

Julien Bayle is a minimalist sound and visual artist working at the juncture of sound, visual and digital data.
Through successive digitally generated and evolving sequences, Disrupt!on explores the phenomenon of disturbance. It reflects how a deterministic system can produce - through its existence within a wider system and through external interventions - an effect which becomes unpredictable.

The Disrupt!on performance at Villa Paloma is an electronic piece lasting about 30 minutes exploring and developing all the work’s concepts, producing its sounds and displaying the continuous flow of data. The performer interacts with sound, sometimes changing the low-level parameters of the oscillators, sometimes altering time parameters without ever using a proper tempo, but every time destabilising the very system he created.

The Disrupt!on installation at news of the world is London is triggered by the start of the live sound/visual performance in Monaco which activates some of the installation’s processes through the internet, using basic communication protocols. The data fed into the algorithms by the artist creates an aural and visual output which, from Monaco, evolves, informed, corrupted and ruptured by audience interaction through social networks as the data travels the net to London. The higher the number of interaction, the greater the unpredictability of the system’s output.

After the end of the performance in Monaco, the London installation is fully launched, and the stimuli received from the present audience or tele-participant, through Twitter via #blpmc, continue to disrupt the installation, creating glitches, reaction, random events and system degeneration. Each hashtag are sensed and contribute to increase the global installation’s entropy.

Experimenting with the concept of control vs. chaos both in his installations and live performances, Julien Bayle draws from Richard Artschwager's "blp" idea, seen as a kind of sudden burst of information within various landscapes.

In our era of digital sound and cloud computing, the name itself (blp pronounced “blip”) refers to an electronic sound suddenly appearing in our soundscape as a noise, an alarm or a tune… (like Artschwager blp suddenly appears in a landscape). Within a computer and network based audio-visual system, they can be translated into a behavior that would be new, uncanny and disruptive.

The originals blps - an oblong shape developed by Richard Artschwager in 1967-1968 - were flat painted pieces of wood, but he soon made them from spray paints and stencils, adhesive decals and rubberized hair. In 1971, the exhibition Sonsbeek buiten de perken (Sonsbeek Between Lawn and Order) took place in the Netherlands. Artschwager’s contribution, Utrecht Projekt, consisted of blps installed around the city and a catalogue of photo-documentation showing the blps in urban and rural settings. The catalogue was accompanied by an album that played the sound of a ticking clock on one side and that of a dripping tap on the other. He considered these mundane noises an auditory counterpart to his blps: background sounds that often go unheeded, but which, once noticed, are almost impossible to ignore.

Friday 28 March 2014, performance starts 7pm sharp (GMT) in London at news of the world, 50 Resolution Way, London SE8 4NT and 8pm sharp local time at Nouveau Musée National de Monaco-Villa Paloma, 56 Boulevard du Jardin Exotique 98000 Monaco. www.nmnm.mcnouveau musee national Monaco

 

 

Sean Steadman, Jackie Raynal, Trenton Oldfield

Private view: Friday 31st January 2014, 6.30 to 9pm. Exhibition runs to 2nd March 2014

Jackie Raynal, Deux Fois, film still
Jackie Raynal, Deux Fois, film still


In the war against the Giants, the satyrs went into battle riding on donkeys. As they caught sight of the enemy, the asses were so terrified that they all let out a loud braying such as the Giants had never heard. At the noise, the Giants hastily took flight and thus were defeated by the satyrs on asses.

This of course never happened.

The works in the exhibition ostensibly provide the metadata necessary to weave similarly epic poems and mythical journeys: they feature central characters, antagonists, create context, setting a theatrical scene, using many narrative conventions familiar to our personal browsers.
Sean Steadman's painting series feature a satyr-like character in constructed mythological landscapes and on the cusp of action. Jackie Raynal's film Deux Fois starts with a short description of all the chapters we are about to see, the bard's invocation before the retelling of an epic. Trenton Oldfield's diving suit points to the armoured relic of a protagonist damned by the Greek chorus of elders in his moral quest. The paintings, the film and object introduce us in media res -in the midst of things- to a tableaux of deeds to be performed, adversaries defeated, and on, towards a satisfactory conclusion.

This of course never happens.

For whilst we stand ready to provide the correlations and associations which would synthesise the story, the narrative has in fact been left off-frame.
In his figurative portrayal of something which does not exist, amongst stylised props and geometrical shapes which our mind readily accepts as nature, Steadman's paintings focus on the methods, rules and techniques of representation. In Deux Fois, the image is dislocated from the sound, the long takes, travelling shots, repetitions of scenes, the repetition of scenes, improvisation of gestures, the lingering of the recording, the uncomfortable focus on the camera itself (the mirror scene)- and by proxy the viewer-, all dissect the process of constructing the film.
Evacuated of narrative, the tools by which stories would be represented become our own to wield.

And what happens next?

Then, the satyrs rode home, and story-telling flared up around the art world like a nasty rash, barely masking the tired, tried and tested use of medium and supports, the dull continuum of traditional narratives, the conformist nod to the political tedium du jour and the reassertion of the decorum.

I never really went for the stories.
It's the moments I remember.

Sean Steadman, The lesson, 2013 Sean Steadman, The Lesson

 

 

Encyclops. by seekers of lice
opening Friday 29 November 2013, 6 to 9pm
Saturdays and Sundays, 1 to 6pm

 

seekers of lice seekers of lice

Over October and November, 'Propositions for Principles of art Philosophy in Practice, a Production Phenomenon' at news of the world invited and exhibited ideas and proposals, correspondence and conversations, that will inform our forthcoming programme beyond visual art and prevailing networks.

Stemming from this process, Encyclops is a poetry work from seekers of lice.
The work is hand written on the wetted surface of 140 small paper bags.

Even though it borrows structure from encyclopaedic articles with headings, explanations and illustrations, the text appears blurred, unassertive of what it may seek to propagate.

The poems incorporate piecemeal narratives, thoughts, feelings, snippet observations, heard conversations. A collection of moments that combine to make a whole, a log of personal recordings edited, re-ordered, they sometimes proceed through associations of sound or appearance of words, and sometimes without discernible logic, flouting the desire for universal meaning.

A modest essay at the commodification of poetry, the objects-paper bags, back-of-an-envelope, carriers for contents other, dispersible and disposable, play down any attempt at grand claims for the work. The throwaway material gestures at a way of communicating that is casually intimate.

seekers of lice assumes the mantle of a 'minor poet'; a minor chord which yields a tone but clouds the tune; a bid to eschew resolution and the want to be major, influential, great, serious, monumental, superior. The systematic sapping of her own authority creates a space where the reader/viewer is emboldened to enjoy, hunts for moments in common, pick what’s useful for what they are doing, and approach the ordinary with new possibilities.
 
propositions for
principles of art
philosophy in
practice, a
production
phenomenon
opening Friday 27th September 2013, 6 to 9pm

documentation ongoing on notwgallery.wordpress.com

Here is the score:

Six Exhibits

Ceiling
First wall
Second wall
Third wall
Fourth wall
Floor

George Brecht, 1961

 

You say you want a revolution:
'I’m fed up with everything' Miuccia Prada (Financial Times, Sept 21, 2013)

 

Hi, I’m just back in London. Are you making any interesting stuff at the mo?
You working on something? Come to news of the world space or drop me an email to meet at yours.
Tbh I’m bored of the push notification feeds I get in my gmail, names doing the rounds, best in show and pedigrees...
But I’d quite like to hear what you are up to: that’s the show, and it’s a conversation towards the coming year’s programme. Think syntopicon in panavision, research in motion and art theory in practice... Get in touch! X

Sept-Oct 2013

 
 
Stefan Hoderlein a walk in the park

preview Friday 31st May 2013, 6 to 9pm

opening in the presence of the artist: Friday 28 June, 6 to 9pm

A walk in the park by STefan Hoderlein

Im Wald, im Wald! da konnt ich führen
Ein freies Leben mit Geistern und Tieren;
Feen und Hochwild von stolzem Geweih,
Sie nahten sich mir ganz ohne Scheu.


Heinrich Heine (from Waldeinsamkeit)

(In the woods, in the woods! There I could lead /A free life with spirits and animals; /Fairies and deers with proud antlers /they approached me without fear)

 

The times you wish to walk out, withdraw, pull out of the game because it has become just a game. Disengage…

Suffering from a sexually transmitted disease, Heinrich Heine spends the last years of his life semi paralysed and partly blind in Paris. There he composes Waldeinsamkeit, in which he recalls a nature retreat in Helgoland shortly before his decision to divert his Romantic energies away from poetry and into the political battles of restoration Europe. Twenty years on, 1851, looking back, the incompatibility he used to make between poetry and his philosophical and political writing seems nonsensical; he now assesses, through his renewed poetic drive, that the revelry, the myths, the magical world of tales and the private realm of the imagination, are in fact an essential part in the struggle against the reactionary -religious or Jacobins- forces of his time.

Around the same time in Concord, USA, a man sets out to live in a forest for two years, two months and two days. “I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life”. In Walden or a life in the woods, this man, Henry David Thoreau argues the importance of solitude, contemplation, and closeness to nature in finding the true self and transcending “the life of quiet desperation which most men lead”.

The creation of public parks attempted the reciprocal taming of nature and men, offering “public walks calculated to promote the health and comfort of the inhabitants”, because “want of recreation generated incipient disease, discontent; which in its turn led to attacks upon the Government”. But from the outset, parks were used in ways which deeply disturbed some public minds. Ensuing moral panics, regulation and further, constantly shifting, uses, they remained ideal spaces of appropriation, contestation and debate; where norms of behaviour could be forged, contested or established; and where behaviour beyond the norms could retain the Romantic appeal of transgression.

“A Walk in the park” is a feature length work by Stefan Hoderlein filmed using a thermographic camera. This technology developed for security and military purposes is used here to capture the perimeters of a bucolic cruising ground near Düsseldorf.

The camera operates outside the spectrum of visible light: it maps the territory of heat. All objects emit a certain amount of infrared radiation as a function of their temperature. Trees, benches, people. The film’s thermal images are bright, intense colours, pseudo-colours. Each colour represents a different temperature: white and red, traditionally but subjectively, used for higher temperatures, to green, blue and violet for colder ones. Darkness transforms into light. For Hoderlein, directness, honesty, the celebratory and rude pride. By other means, what can’t be seen will be made to be seen.

The individual with intentional stance enacts a temporary walkout; performing the pragmatic in the face of impossibility, joining in an irrational illusory social loophole, celebrating the joy of this delimited pastoral precinct, where the weight of society is lifted collectively in the company of men.

The halted traveller surveying the countryside; the hermit in the undergrowth, shed of his possessions, seeking simplicity in the poverty of connections; the nature, empty screen to project our grief; the hunter in the solitude, cock as bait, catching a reflection of himself; the magical pull of some untamed wilderness, domesticated; and the moments of madness; trolls and living nightmares caught between the liminal dreamscape, fog and redemption, wanderlust in a timeless idyll; and the walker slow-pacing with affected nonchalance, measuring the territory, roaming down utopia drive; the loneliness, the eternal pain, the horror, awe; the bug chaser catching his death; desire and apprehension, the ritualistic and the kinship.

 

 
 
Intensive care
or such urgent times we live!

Part 2 at Enclave gallery: Harold Offeh, Chris Rawcliffe, Eileen Perrier, Denise Hawrysio, James Robertson, Steven Morgana Part 1 at news of the world: Rose Gibbs, Richard Parry, Esther Planas, Markus Vater, Stephen Wilson, Sam Curtis


Friday 29 March 2013: Rose Gibbs
Saturday 30 March: Richard Parry

Friday 5 April: Esther Planas
Saturday 6 April: Markus Vater

Friday 12 April: Stephen Wilson
Saturday 13 April: Sam Curtis

Friday 26 April: Harold Offeh
Saturday 27 April: Chris Rawcliffe

Friday 3 May: Eileen Perrier
Saturday 4 May: Denise Hawrysio

Friday 10 May: James Robertson
Saturday 11 May: Steven Morgana



An important rule one learns in basic first aid training and lifesaving: the casualties that scream for attention are not the priority in the first instance, no matter how desperate their cries. You go to the silent ones first.

The facility with which art institution press releases, exhibition concepts, curator's statements deploy the concept and language of 'urgency' can recall the strident shrieks of a weather presenter forecasting heavy rains in Wales and the drama of an everything-must-go sale in the high street.

This 'urgency', and seeking its bestowment onto the art object itself, becomes a theatrical framing device. As a visibility strategy, it seeks to raise a consumer craving for action and intervention and to fulfill this with a presentation of artworks. Bent on drama, it scripts the parameters in which these works are to operate. As a call for action, it sucks the lifeblood out of the social and political context to spit out lymphatic dogmatic rhetoric.

news of the world space in Deptford exists as a 'curator's studio', allowing works to be looked at in an R+D / process setting.

Each Friday and Saturday over the coming weeks, one new artist is present in the space. Under the curator’s duty of care, the artist on an examination bench inhabits the gallery alongside their work, underlying the visitors’ part in the diagnosis of observable trauma, anxiety, acute failure, unstable critical condition or fitness for purpose.

Rather than summoning 'urgency', Intensive Care refers to some of the procedures and mechanisms which can deal with emergency; aligning in one space the artist, the work, the curator, the visitor, to take the time and foster calm, focus, expertise, dialogue and unity of purpose in the truthful assessment of the artwork.

Is 'urgency' a symptom of a much deeper malaise affecting the curator patient?

'The possibility of physical and mental collapse is very real now... but collapse is out of the question; as a solution or even a cheap alternative, it is unacceptable. Indeed. This is the moment of truth, that fine and fateful line between control and disaster' Hunter S Thompson

 
Friday 10 May, James Robertson was at news of the world

Saturday 11 May, Steven Morgana was at news of the world
STeven Morgana

Friday 3 May, Eileen Perrier was at news of the world
Eileen Perrier Eileen Perrier Mobile portraits
 
Saturday 4 May, Denise Hawrysio was present at news of the world
Denise Hawrysio. Still trying to find the space between. 2013

Friday 26 April, Harold Offeh was at news of the world
Harold Offeh

in Covers an ongoing series of performances Harold Offeh attempts to transform a series of music album covers from 70s and 80s into durational performances.
Covers. After Funkadelic. Maggot Brain, 1971 (V2) will see Offeh try to re-enact Funkadelic's Maggot Brain, 1971. The original cover depicts the scream of a buried afro haired woman, Offeh reconstructs the image in the gallery. This will be one of several Covers enacted live on the night. The performances will be accompanied by music from the original albums.

Harold Offeh works in a range of media including performance, video, photography, interactive and digital media, employing humour as a means to confront the viewer with an assessment of contemporary popular culture. He studied at the University of Brighton and the Royal College of Art, London. Recently Offeh has approached the themes of futurism and hair through collective live engagements with other artists, performers and community participation. He has shown widely both in the UK and internationally. He lives in London and works in Leeds where he is a senior lecturer in Fine Art at Leeds Metropolitan University. Recent exhibition include:
IN YOUR FACE, SHOW studio, London, 2012. GLAMOURIE, Project Space Leeds, Leeds, UK, 2012. GARDEN OF REASON, Ham House and Gardens, Richmond, UK, 2012. ART ON THE UNDERGROUND COMMISSION, London, UK, 2013.

 

 
Saturday 27 April, Chris Rawcliffe was at news of the world
Chris Rawcliffe

Friday 29 March, Rose Gibbs was present at news of the world
Vomitting Woman by Rosie Gobbs Squatting Woman by Rose Gibbs
 

Saturday 30th March 12 to 6pm, Richard Parry was present at news of the world

Richard Parry


Friday, 5th April, Esther Planas was at news of the world, 12 to 6pm

Esther Planas Urban Subconscious Transferences Action One
Urban Environmental Speedy Interactions (phase two)
Urban Intervention num. 5
Film, Field Recordings and a Narration of a Journey

Esther is presenting new films made during a recent stay in Puerto Rico: 'As usual with my previous works on urban interventions, I had found the site during a drift around the area.
We arrived and started our way of sensing the space and getting it activated, placing the fabrics, and then slowly too, we started to move.
A guy arrived on site and after observing us with a smile on his face we started to have a conversation but in general it was him somehow, who had something special to say: it was quite amazing to hear his statements about art and artist, spirits and God. Our aim had actually been accomplished, we had communicated with some one from the site and we had activated an unused space and got connected with higher ways of conscience and animas too.
Been immersed by the tropical feel and wild warmth of a Nature that is lived and cared for on an animist dialectic, where 'animas and forces' reveal themselves to us. My performance as staying just there, breathing, while placed on that urban tropical derelict context flowing with the breeze as the leaves and moving slightly.
'

Edition on basic i-movie' and sound track from i-movie's archive of 'natural sounds'.

 

Saturday 6th April, 12 to 6pm Markus Vater was present at news of the world with a show of published and unpublished books and magazines

Magazines by Markus Vater

 

Friday 12 April, Stephen Wilson was present at news of the world

Untitled by Stephen Wilson
 

On Saturday 13th April, Sam Curtis was at news of the world

Through video, text and performance, Sam Curtis' interest lies in the boundaries between different forms of artistic and non-artistic labour, where art and life are indistinguishable, and where he invites an audience to play as he continues to wrestle with the age old debate of why make art? And for who? On site at news of the world, Sam will be developing a work in progress: VÄXLA :to toggle, to alternate.

 
 


serial attempts: Berti, Ferreira, Gbaguidi
curated by Christine Eyene
Preview Friday 25th January 2013, 6 to 9pm.
 

Serial Attempts is the first presentation of process: immaterial proposal, an ongoing curatorial research project consisting of an evolving assembling of images, texts, and sound pieces focusing on concepts, studies and works-in-progress. The project reflects on the space between the artist's intention and the finished artwork by looking at fragments of the creative process. The title of this exhibition “serial attempts” draws from an expression used by Professor Hans Belting in the introductory chapter of The Invisible Masterpiece (1998, transl. 2001) in which he discusses unrealisable aspirations in art. Three artists have been selected for this showcase Cristiano Berti (Italy), Cecilia Ferreira (Mozambique/South Africa) and Pélagie Gbaguidi (Benin/Belgium), each represented by one piece or body of work.

Berti’s sound installation Happy (2004) is a work begun in 2002 that initially comprised of a video and photographic "mapping" of Happy's body. Berti, however, chooses to remove the photographic evidence and only displays the protagonist’s voice recorded in studio in December 2004. Happy is heard narrating the story behind the scars marking her skin, in Edo, one of Nigeria’s languages. The public is led to draw on their senses to reconstruct the shapes and depths of the scars and imagine the tactility of the skin while being immersed in the musicality of a foreign language.

Cecilia Ferreira’s The Chaos Within (2009) is the artist’s first video-experiment. Filmed with a webcam, the piece presents the successive stages of creation of the artist’s self-portrait, leading to the destruction and desecration of both the artwork and her own image as part of the creative process.

Pélagie Gbaguidi’s series Conciliabule (2003-2006) is shown here as images from her notebooks. Eight “captures” have been selected to reveal the artist’s thoughts through annotations and sketches seemingly jotted as spontaneous creative impulses. This body of work, first presented alongside the artist’s notebooks in the exhibition “En Toute Innocence”, Galerie Imane Farès, Paris (2011), gave the impetus to “process: immaterial proposal” which object is to apprehend art, notably produced by African artists, beyond fixed narratives, representations, and identities.

Serial Attempts is curated by Christine Eyene and organised in collaboration with Making Histories Visible.

 

Christine Eyene is an art historian, critic and curator practicing in the field of modern and contemporary art from Africa and its Diasporas, with a particular interest in representations of the body and gender narratives. She was co-curator the 10th edition of the Dak’Art Biennale (2012) and curator of the African selection of the 3rd edition of Photoquai – Biennial of World Images (2011). Her other projects include “Reflections on the Self – Five African Women Photographers”, a Hayward Touring Exhibition (2011-2013). She has recently been appointed Guild Research Fellow – Contemporary Art, at the School of Art, Design and Performance, University of Central Lancashire (UCLan).
 
Pelagie Gbaguidi in serial attempts at news of the world. Pelagie Gbaguidi in Serial attempts curated by Christine Eyene

news of the world opened in June 2012 to present work that needs to be seen or shown as it might be in a curator’s research studio. As one exhibition transmogrifies into the next, physical works gradually accrue in the space as trace evidence of the mind’s trajectory.

 
 
Herman Makkink
Opened 26 October 2012. Artist reception: Friday 30th November 2012, 6pm.

Herman Makkink Rocking Machine

You are in a dream. Your body is in a state of suspended sensory activity. Your muscles paralysed. Your mind hovers in bright white contained space.
Scattered around that space some vaguely familiar, flattish three-dimensional objects in coordinated shades of white and black. A bit further at the back, a large shiny dark panel inclined against the wall. From where you are, you can't distinguish whether it is the thing, or the thing's support. You proceed to move towards it, to get a closer look, find out what it is. Yet as you do, it appears to glide further away without the space getting any deeper. Distance somehow remains the same.
You feel nothing. You hear voices, conversations, glasses but, as if you were on a theatre stage, you can not see anyone.
You turn around for a moment and observe the delicate isolation of the other spot lit objects placed in the room with the exquisite parsimony of contemporary set design. You resolve to stay immobile for now and to rush back at the least expected moment towards the large dark panel.
You wait...
You wait...
Now!
As you turn and accelerate back towards the end of the gallery, your mind crashes at speed into the proscenium glass and you wake up. Mind empty.


In the cinema.
The art work, with the other props, establishes the scene before the words.
There is no scope for ambivalence or complex interpretation: art in a film must 'read well'.
It must look like art.
It must support the action.
There is no time to contemplate or ambiguate. The story moves on. Action, close-up, shortcut to meaning, consolidation of narrative. Snap.
Makkink's Rocking Machine starred in two feature films: Dropout (Tinto Brass 1970) and Clockwork Orange (Stanley Kubrick 1971). In both films, the sculptural work -the surreal fusion of female hind parts with a phallus- appears to connect to an empowered, sexually liberated female character. But violent scenes quickly follow, where, in Tinto Brass, the woman is brutalised, and where, in the Kubrick, she is killed by the work itself.


The object in time
The installation at news of the world spans 40 years setting the Rocking Machine in the context of Herman Makkink's most recent works.
Time lapsed affords us the luxury to delve into the depth and complexity of the artist's work. Over time, he has used extremely varied techniques and materials. Some dictated by the period: fibreglass in the late 60s used by many artists seeking a contemporary space-age aesthetic. Others by its rejection: bricks and reed, salt blocks, plaster. But always preferring blatantly impractical construction methods towards anti aesthetic installations.
What I see now:
The surreal-ish juxtaposition of disparate images or concepts which imply (or formulate) a secret link, connections and journeys across time and geographies and myths.
Drawing as a sort of Joseph Cornell mind-box played out in a human dimension
Images of latent chaos, ruins and disorder, or where the work itself is pregnant of its own disintegration.
In between:
The works created by the desire to shock, or in the hope to please, or because you did not care or cared too much.
And what is still important to you today.

Herman Makkink at news of the worldHerman makkink at news of the world gallery

Further information on Herman Makkink's website here.

 

 

Le jeu de Marseille

Opened from 31 August 2012

Jeu de Marseille

Victor Brauner
Andre Breton
Oscar Dominguez
Max Ernst
Jacques Herold
Wifredo Lam
Jacqueline Lamba
Andre Masson

 

The reason for existence, the singularity of news of the world ’s permanent and physical art space can now be discerned. As we observed the initial, inaugural installation by celebrated artist Angel Vergara suffer entropic dissolution and decay, it metamorphosed, in fits and starts, leading to the production of another installation through transmogrifying spurts in process over the last couple of weeks.

The scent of marjoram, of lavender, the ceramic cicades, the made-in-china plastic birds, glasses of Marseille pastis, the provisional garde furniture, stand in as a sketch of a wartime South of France garden. Because, to progress, we have to take you back.

Vergara’s installation suggested art-making as a public act and the political impotence of the artist; our mind now turns to the surrealists’ quest to change life, yet choosing to distance themselves from what they saw as the limitations of the present moment.

The new exhibition at news of the world provides a space for the audience to pass time playing cards with the gallery staff.

The set of cards –le jeu de Marseille- was designed collectively by Brauer, Breton, Dominguez, Ernst, Herold, Lam, Lamba and Masson as they waited in Marseille -along with Duchamp, Peret, Levi Strauss and others-, 1940-1941, for visas to escape Europe for America. This episode will be seen by some as marking the terminal decline of surrealism, whilst others see their migration as a catalyst for experiment in American art.

The immersive disengagement required by card playing, a gap the mind makes, an economically unproductive time, echoes the surrealists’ refusal to engage in the world conflict, when engagement would mean allegiance to a party or to despised institutions, and therefore ethical compromise.

The Jeu de Marseille was designed to change symbolic representation, not to enact change itself. Ending the persistent societal values in a deck of cards, Kings, Queens and subaltern Jacks become Sirens, Genius and Magicians. Reflecting the essence of the surrealists’ interest in language, the hidden, chance and poetry and the creation of new modern mythologies, the four suits are replaced by love, knowledge, dream and revolution.

'Their revolutionary declarations remain purely theoretical as they do not impact on their actions… They remain the parasites of the very class they insult' nauseated Sartre in 1947. Post war surrealists will reply by advocating withdrawal and insubordination as the true responsibility of the artist/intellectual who must look beyond the commentary of current affairs ('l’ecart absolu'), dismissing the idea that work should be dictated by its immediate context.

In inviting you to play cards at news of the world, we are offering the game as a conversation with no narrative, as a tentative synthesis of the cards’ new values with the old games rules, and the option to waste your time as an affirmative artistic act.


Jeu de Marseille Victor Brauner, Andre Breton, Oscar Dominguez, Max Ernst, Jacques Herold, Wilfredo Lam, Jacqueline Lamba, Andre Masson


 

angel vergara

Opened 15 June 2012 6.30 to 9pm.

Pasolini Berlusconi diptyque by Angel Vergara

On 15 June 2012, news of the world throws open its doors to embark on a new phase for exhibition making. We will present work that needs to be seen; shown as it might in the artist’s studio; neither a dogmatic parcours; nor a packaged presentation of wats-hot wats-nots.

news of the world is a physical space, a personal editing process and a “curator’s studio”, albeit the endeavour may be anti-curating.

news of the world opens with Angel Vergara. Other artists, other works will accrue, as we embrace the post-contemporary and pursue our philosophical and curatorial researches, with the ability to get diverted by new finds or meetings.

Angel Vergara’s diptyque “Berlusconi Pasolini” juxtaposes the position of these two public figures with the mass media: Pasolini denouncing its standardising effect, its flattening of Italian society into sterile conformity (including the conformity in contestation), Berlusconi in control of the national media, but in the end powerless to govern.

Through sometimes aggressive, at other times tentative, paint brushstrokes, the video work also focuses on the powerlessness of the artist in apprehending, fixing, the flow of news and daily political feuilleton, nevertheless pointing to the need to maintain a constant and inflexible critical mind.


Angel Vergara is currently showing in ARTandPRESS at Martin Gropius Bau, Berlin and represented Belgium at the Venice Biennale 54th international art exhibition in 2011. Other recent solo exhibitions and projects have included ’Monday: Firework; Tuesday: Illuminations; Wednesday: Revolution’, Argos Centre for Art and Media, Brussels in 2010; Stella Lohaus Gallery, ARCO, Madrid in 2009 ’Angel Vergara. Nous, les oeuvres d’art…’ at Etablissement d’en face projects, Brussels 2008 Art Premiere (with Joëlle Tuerlinckx), Stella Lohaus Gallery, Art Basel 2007 EACC, l’espai d’art contemporani de Castelló, Spain ’Straatman’s Happy entry into Brussels’, Stella Lohaus Gallery, Antwerp; ’Portraits’, MAC’s Grand Hornu, Belgium 2006 ’Actes et Tableaux – Retransmissions –’, MAC’s, Grand-Hornu, Begium; ’El Callajero’, Cultureel Centrum Strombeek-Bever, Belgium. He is represented by Almine Rech Gallery. This is Angel Vergara’s first exhibition in London.


Angel Vergara Diptyque Berlusconi Pasolini

Notes on the artist:

Angel Vergara grew up in Brussels. His body of work contains a wide range of media and disciplines, including performances, drawings, paintings, videos and installations, and a bar. Audiovisual material plays an important role in the majority of Vergara’s exhibitions, as well as making up a substantial part of his work. The material deals with performance recordings, parts of video and other installations, and autonomous film and video work. A continuous cross-fertilisation between art and life is a major constant, with additional focus on the particularity of the artist’s position.

The oldest audiovisual material by Angel Vergara dates from the late eighties. In his Peintures filmiques, Vergara mainly filmed scenes and elements from his own social and artistic background. At the same time, he adopted a subjective perspective towards a heterogeneous spectrum of social and artistic topics (a shoemaker at work, an office building, Marcel Broodthaers’ tomb) through simple editing techniques such as accelerating images. A few years later, Vergara created his Films actions, a series of recordings of performances in which his alter ego Straatman, a figure seen sitting underneath a white canvas in a public space, is introduced; Vergara walking around with brush in hand, tracing the outlines of people and objects around him and thus socially interacting with his environment. The same act is performed in an already mediatised ’reality’ – when Vergara marks his appropriation of existing media images with the same gesture of painting. Through the figure of Straatman, Vergara expresses himself as a kind of medium to a social and cultural background.

In contrast to this, he increasingly relates himself to media images he appropriates as an artist in his autonomous video work. From the mid-2000s, Angel Vergara has created videos in which he follows the shapes and lines of reality with a brush, as if the image were a pallet of paint, or in which he applies his brush to a glass plate placed between the cinematic reality and the camera. Generally intended for multi-channel installations, these videos reveal the tension between the artist’s position and the social history.

In the videos of the exhibition he created with Argos in 2010 (Monday: Firework; Tuesday: Illuminations; Wednesday: Revolution, 2010), historical artistic personalities such as Gustave Wappers and Antoine Wiertz played a central part. Vergara reminding his audience that these artists assumed on a social and political role. In his own work, however, he prefers to occupy the position of mediator introduced by Gustave Courbet. This role, usually assumed by modern art, does not exclude him from adopting a critical position. He bleaches the images he has filmed through digital techniques, which are neither high-tech nor subtle. Vergara belongs to a generation of artists for whom accessible and cheap media technology – available to everyone – also embodies a universal artistic ideal. Nevertheless, the actual creation remains a private process: Vergara sits alone underneath the canvas, and he also paints alone.

Dyptique Berlusconi Pasolini, Angel Vergara

news of the world
SPACE: 50 Resolution Way, London SE8 4NT
TEXT: 07851 318 230
EMAIL: pierre@thecentreofattention.org

Getting there from London Bridge, platform 1/4, 6 mins to Deptford train every 10 mins. Resolution Way is across the road from the station. From East London, Overground to New Cross, and 8 mins walk