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BRAND NEW RUIN

 

Andreas Angelidakis

 


White walls have become the ubiquitous “exhibition tool” for curators of contemporary art exhibitions.
These walls are built up and torn down according to the needs of each exhibition, and even though they are so essential to these art spaces they are not really recognized as architecture, but rather a as a service for spatial solution. These walls represent an architectural lowlife; a raw material delegated to art-centers storage spaces, often made up from scratch using previous incarnations of themselves.
In this sense, these walls are a sort of ghost, appearing and disappearing inside the museum. They are a ruin in disguise, a ruin and a construction site at the same time, as they are time and again demolished and built back up for the next exhibition. Conceptually they could be described as a building bouncing back and forth from ruination to construction, always on the move.

Diametrically opposite from the status of these white walls, Historical Ruins in architecture hold an almost saintly status. They are carefully preserved, sometimes in a manicured “ruined state” to perfectly remind one of the romantic 18th century Grand Tour engravings, a delight of classical decay. Other times these ruins are restored to their past glory, and most probably to serve a new important function that is related to Culture and often imes Art. The carcass of Sutton Scarsdale Hall represents this type of Important Ruin, even though as a building it started out as a functional object. The SSH represents the kind of ruin whose value has been recognized both as a remnant of an interesting building and a beautiful ruin frozen in time.
In proposing a pavilion for postcontemporary curating we decided to bring these two types of ruins together. The ruin of SSH as it is, and the Future Ruin of white exhibition walls which together will serve the needs of postcontemporary curatorial practices. We defined a Universal Exhibition Wall module whose dimensions are based both on a thrifty use of construction material and ideal exhibition and projection proportions.


 

Brand new ruin

 

Raising these exhibition walls to the level of real architecture we propose a system of White Exhibition Walls to construct the pavilion as a ruin in flux, a building which inhabits the carcass of SSH as a shifting pile of debris, a mountain of white walls deposited in front and within the building. The Modular White Walls become structure, floor, ceiling, space dividers and of course walls.


The resulting pavilion merges the pristine spaces offered by a “white cube” type of space with the spatial complexity and contradiction offered by an architectural gesture as the white clean mass meets the earthy fading ruin of SSH in a fictional mix of space and time. As both ruins grow old together, the white ruin starts to be inhabited by plant life, because it realizes that a ruin is in fact a building on its way back to nature.


 

White walls

 

White walls have become the ubiquitous “exhibition tool” for curators. These walls are an architectural lowlife; a ruin in disguise.


 

demolished and built back up for the next exhibition

 

again and again
demolished and built back up for the next exhibition.

they are a ruin
and a construction site
at the same time

 

Historical ruins

 

Historical Ruins
hold an almost
saintly status.

We decided to bring these two types of ruins together.

 

 

The pavilion

 

The resulting pavilion merges the pristine spaces offered by a “white cube” with the spatial complexity of an architectural gesture


 

Mix of time and space

 

the white clean mass meets
the earthy fading ruin of SSH
in a fictional mix
of space and time

 

 

Plant life

 

As both ruins grow old together, the white ruin starts to be inhabited by plant life,


 

nature

 

because it realizes that
a ruin is in fact a building on its way back
to nature.

 

 

Inside space

 

 

 

Elevated space

 

 

 

Upper levels

 


 

From above

 


 

Andreas Angelidakis

 


 

Sutton Scarsdale Hall

 


 

Pavilion of Postcontemporary curating entrance

 


 

Aerial view of Sutton Scarsdale

 


 

AA Studio proposal

 

 

 

The pavilion of post contemporary curating